RESEARCH ARTICLE


The Effect of Reading Strategies and Prior Knowledge on Cognitive Load and Learning with Hypertext



R. Ignacio Madrid*, Jose J. Canas
Cognitive Ergonomics Group, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja, s/n. 18071 Granada, Spain.


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Ignacio Madrid et al.; Licensee Bentham Open

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Cognitive Ergonomics Group, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja, s/n. 18071 Granada, Spain; E-mail: nmadrid@ugr.es


Abstract

Reading strategies, prior knowledge and cognitive load are some variables that have been related with comprehension and learning with hypertext systems. In this study we analyze the effect of two different hypertext reading strategies – coherence and interest – and two prior knowledge levels – low and high - on cognitive load, and their relation with learning. For low prior knowledge readers, data reveal that following a coherence strategy leads to lower cognitive load during reading and better learning. For high prior knowledge readers, following an interest strategy produce higher cognitive load during reading than a coherence strategy, but they learned equally from both strategies. These results are discussed taking into account the implication of two different components of cognitive load (extraneous and germane cognitive load).